Social Psychology Network

Maintained by Scott Plous, Wesleyan University

Carol Dweck

Carol Dweck

My work bridges developmental psychology, social psychology, and personality psychology, and examines the self-conceptions people use to structure the self and guide their behavior. My research looks at the origins of these self-conceptions, their role in motivation and self-regulation, and their impact on achievement and interpersonal processes.

I teach courses in Personality and Social Development as well as Motivation.

Primary Interests:

  • Applied Social Psychology
  • Attitudes and Beliefs
  • Motivation, Goal Setting
  • Person Perception
  • Personality, Individual Differences
  • Self and Identity
  • Social Cognition

Note from the Network: The holder of this profile has certified having all necessary rights, licenses, and authorization to post the files listed below. Visitors are welcome to copy or use any files for noncommercial or journalistic purposes provided they credit the profile holder and cite this page as the source.

Image Gallery

Books:

Journal Articles:

  • Molden, D. C., & Dweck, C. S. (2006). Finding “meaning” in psychology: A lay theories approach to self-regulation, social perception, and social development. American Psychologist, 61, 192-203.
  • Plaks, J. E, Grant, H., & Dweck, C. S. (2005). Violations of implicit theories and the sense of prediction and control: Implications for motivated person perception. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 88, 245-262.
  • Grant, H., & Dweck, C. S. (2003). Clarifying achievement goals and their impact. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 85, 541-553.
  • Levy, S., Plaks, J., Chiu, C., Hong, Y., & Dweck, C. S. (2001). Static versus dynamic theories and the perception of groups: Different routes to different destinations. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 5, 156-168.
  • Plaks, J., Stroessner, S., Dweck, C. S., & Sherman, J. (2001). Person theories and attention allocation: Preference for stereotypic vs. counterstereotypic information. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 80, 876-893.
  • Levy, S., Stroessner, S., & Dweck, C. S. (1998). Stereotype formation and endorsement: The role of implicit theories. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 74, 1421-1436.
  • Mueller, C. M., & Dweck, C. S. (1998). Intelligence praise can undermine motivation and performance. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 75, 33-52.
  • Dweck, C. S., Chiu, C., & Hong, Y. (1995). Implicit theories and their role in judgments and reactions: A world from two perspectives. Psychological Inquiry, 6, 267-285.
  • Burhans, K., & Dweck, C. S. (1995). Helplessness in early childhood: The role of contingent worth. Child Development, 66, 1719-1738.
  • Dweck, C. S., & Leggett, E. L. (1988). A social-cognitive approach to motivation and personality. Psychological Review, 95, 256-273.

Other Publications:

  • Dweck, C. S. (2002). Beliefs that make smart people dumb. In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), Why smart people do stupid things. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Carol Dweck
Department of Psychology
Jordan Hall, Building 420
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305
United States

  • Phone: (650) 725-2421
  • Fax: (650) 725-5699

Send a message to Carol Dweck

reCAPTCHA challenge image
Incorrect please try again
For security, type both words: For security, type the words:

Note: You will be emailed a copy of your message.

Psychology Headlines

From Around the World

News Feed (35,797 subscribers)